Microsoft drops hints about imminent announcement of a new Windows successor to Windows 10




Yesterday we echoed a mysterious announcement from the official Windows account on Twitter, summoning us to some kind of event that would take place on June 24, in which we can know "the next news for Windows".



Not for 'Windows 10': for 'Windows', just. And yes, although obviously at a semantic level we all know that the second also includes the first, it is not lost on us that the rules of marketing are something different, and that those kinds of details they matter a lot.



It must be made clear that officially "the next version of Windows" is still Windows 10 21H2, and that it is not ruled out at all that, as important as the new update may be, this does not have to entail a change of numbering.



But it is that, beyond the forgetfulness of two numbers, Microsoft has dropped some clues that imply that we may not be facing oblivion.



Following the breadcrumbs



The first is that, according to the invitation that Microsoft has begun to send to the media, the event in question will be attended by Satya Nadella, Microsoft CEO, and Palos Panay, Windows 10 Product Manager: a poster of a very high level to be a mere update (which, by the way, could have been announced during Microsoft Build 2021).







Microsoft talks about its vision of a "modern operating system" not to mention Windows even once






The second of them has come from the hand of Yusuf Mehdi, corporate vice president of Microsoft, responsible for the area of ​​'Modern life, search and devices' of the company. In a tweet published a few hours ago, Mehdi claimed not to have been so excited "for a new version of Windows from [el lanzamiento de] Windows 95! ".




Remember that Windows 95 was not a mere 'update' or 'Service Pack' of Windows, but a completely new edition of the operating system. In fact, it was much more than that: it marked a huge technological leap over the old 16-bit Windows 3.x and gave the Starting pistol for Microsoft's Monopoly in the field of desktop operating systems.




In any case, officially "the next version of Windows" is still Windows 10 21H2




Knowing this, we can't help but remember Nadella's words during MS Build 2021, when she stated that they would soon give more details about "one of the most important Windows updates of the last decade". A decade that has seen the release of Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10, as well as all of their respective updates, no less.



But it doesn't end there: Tom Warren, director of The Verge, it states —After having retweeted Mehdi's message— that Microsoft is trying to drop all kinds of clues that we are facing the launch of Windows 11.



And he gives an example of the animation that accompanied the Microsoft tweet ad yesterday: the trail of light that enters through the Windows logo window (by the way, a Windows logo that does not match the current one in Windows 10) lacks a vertical shadow, such that it casts what appears to be an '11':





Windows 11


Promotional image of the event spread by @Windows on Twitter.



Add to that that the event is scheduled for 11 in the morning and the options are reduced: or we are before Windows 11 ... or before a conscious and elaborate 'trolling' of Microsoft.



'Windows 11' could be many things



However, even assuming that we are on the verge of launching Windows 11, that could mean a lot of different things. And we do not have to assume that, simply, we are facing a new Windows that will end up retiring Windows 10 as it did with Windows 8.x.



There has been talk since 2015 that the future of Windows 10 could be in the bet for a model of 'Windows as a service', a "last version" of the operating system before the version numbers lose their importance definitively.



In fact, since then, Microsoft seems hell-bent on move away from the old system of 'service packs', betting on a 'rolling release' model with constant and successive updates. In recent years, Windows' efforts seem to have headed in that direction.



So where does a possible 'Windows 11' fit into that scheme of things? Well, nothing prevents one of these successive big Windows 10 updates from including so many changes that, for marketing purposes, warrants a renumbering even if there is complete continuity with the Windows 10 installation.