WhatsApp backtracks and withdraws its privacy changes, for now until May

Facebook and Instagram will block Trump's accounts "indefinitely" because "the risk is too great"



What happened yesterday in the United States Congress has had a strong impact on the social media environment, which perhaps we cannot yet fully assess.



Twitter quickly blocked Donald Trump's account (not the first time they have taken action against him) and prevented the last video you posted from being retweeted or commented, despite the fact that in it he called his supporters to return to their homes, just because he did not ignore the accusations of electoral fraud against the Democratic Party.



Twitter has threatened the outgoing president to permanently suspend his user account, but Facebook has also announced its own measures to censor the president both from the eponymous social network and from Instagram.



Facebook will prevent 'Trumpism' from spreading its calls



According to Facebook, the "risks of allowing the president to continue using our service during this period are too great", so they will lock their accounts "indefinitely", but at the very least "spend the peaceful transition of power to be completed within two weeks."



The platform claims that in the past they were tolerant of Trump's posts for believing that "the public has the right to the widest possible access to political discourse, even the most controversial one", but that "the current context is fundamentally different.



And it is because they judge that the conservative leader would be using Facebook "to incite a violent insurrection" against "a democratically elected government."







Big tech join the #BlackLivesMatter: when activism jumps from the streets to social media





But it's not just Trump who has become the target of Facebook's moderation policies in recent hours; also all those supporters of yours whose publications fall into some of the following assumptions:



  • Perform calls to bear arms anywhere in the US


  • Praise the events of the Capitol, or merely disseminate videos of the protesters who participated in them, understanding that they "promote criminal activities."


  • Support any protest in Washington DC "even if it's peaceful", if it violates the curfew.


From Facebook they also insist on vindicating all the measures they have been applying in recent months against users, groups and 'fanpages' linked to the QAnon movement, conservative and pro-Trump ...



... measures highly criticized by a sector of users who said they saw in them a double standard compared to that applied to the 'Black Lives Matter' movement, also involved in promoting violent riots.