this is what the new operating system looks like running on a Lumia 950 XL

was born as an intern project at Microsoft



WordArt is one of the most nostalgic elements there can be of computing and the style of the nineties. Hated and loved in equal parts, it is still one of those vestiges of the past that remain in today's Office. Though Today it is little used, it is still part of jokes, and yesterday gave a good surprise.



Nat Brown, an Apple worker and former employee of Valve and other industry greats, he told on Twitter that "I missed the little fellowship project from 1991," referring to WordArt. When asked if he really was the author of the mythical Word function, the developer said yes, that I had done it with a "hooligan", Scott Forstall.




Amazing that the iOS software manager created WordArt





Skeumorphism

Scheumorphism is considered a trend that Forstall and Jobs especially bet on.



Reading the tweet, it seemed incredible to me what Brown was saying. First of all, I was not aware that Scott Forstall had been a Microsoft intern. In that year, he was 22 years old. Is about one of the most important people in the tech industry of the 2000sWell, he was the head of the iPhone software team. Specifically, Scott Forstall was vice president of Apple's iOS operating system, until in 2012, the company announced that it would cease to be after the initial failure of Apple Maps in iOS 6.



He is credited with an obsession for attention to detail similar to that of Jobs, and for anecdotes that are told in books such as that of Ken Kocienda, who developed the keyboard of the original iPhone and participated in large projects such as the creation of zero of Safari, it is known that it was like that. In fact, his name sounded like Jobs's successor until it was Tim Cook who took over from the Apple founder as CEO.







Windows 95 and its old interface are the best example of much that we miss in Windows 10





Something curious in this regard is that WordArt is assimilated to the classic 90's style, and Fortstall is closely related to the scheumorphism that populated iOS until version 7, when Jony Ive took over the direction of software design and flat design came to reign on the platform. WordArt doesn't have much to do with that design trend, but both are actually reminiscent of another era of design. The paradox is that the function looks like an anti-Apple from a book, and was created by one of the people who have given the most to Apple in its history.