A new 'phishing' campaign sends a false statement on perimeter restrictions due to COVID-19 with camouflaged malware



The Internet Security Office has detected in the last hours a new fraudulent email campaign that takes advantage, like so many others lately, of the health crisis caused by the pandemic.



This attempt to phishing pretends to be the Ministry of Health, Consumption and Social Welfare to report a possible perimeter closure in a given city. To check this supposed restriction you must download a file that supposedly contains the answer, as explained from the OSI, which has qualified this security notice of high importance.






The campaign takes place in a few days when the public is even more aware of the restrictions that the health authorities are deciding with respect to Christmas




Malware with the lure of the coronavirus




Mask 5008667 1920



What users will find in this file is not any confirmation about said alleged block, if not malware that when it is run it can most likely infect the computer for various purposes.



It so happens that this fraudulent campaign It occurs precisely in a few days in which the public is awaiting the decisions made by the Ministry of Health and the CC. AA. regarding the restrictions that will apply during Christmas. The chances that users may believe that it is a legitimate email increases.




We must be suspicious of all mail that may be minimally suspicious and, in the event of the slightest doubt, try to confirm its legitimacy










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If we have downloaded the file in question and / or we have executed it, it is recommended that let's scan our equipment with an updated antivirus to check if we have been infected and what we can do. As always, we must be suspicious of any mail that may be minimally suspicious and look at details such as its wording, its purpose, as well as the existence of attachments or links.



If there is the slightest doubt, the best we can do is contact the entity that supposedly sends us this email and make sure it is legitimate before doing anything with it. All precautions are welcome.