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Apple will launch this Thursday Big Sur, the new version of its macOS operating system



Apple today held an online event to introduce the world to its first Macs equipped with Apple Silicon processors. And they have also taken the opportunity to make public new details about the software called to squeeze the possibilities of those.



macOS Big Sur, aka macOS 11, is the new version of Apple's operating system for laptops and desktops, and comes as a successor to macOS Catalina.



If this latest version was already presented in 2019 later than its brothers for mobile devices (iOS / iPadOS), this year Apple has kept the custom, keeping Big Sur as a beta until now.



Universal and emulated applications



But the wait is over: the new macOS will be available for download starting this Thursday, November 12 at all compatible equipment. That is, in regards to desktop computers:



  • Mac Mini from 2014-2020.


  • iMac from 2014-2020.


  • iMac Pro from 2017-2020.


  • Mac Pro from 2013-2020.


In the case of portable computers:



We said before that one of Apple's objectives was to take full advantage of Silicon's potential, and one of the changes introduced in Big Sur is focused precisely on the intelligent management of workload distribution between processor cores, which maximizes its performance while maintaining low power consumption.



Also looking for that performance improvement, from Apple they have announced that all its own apps included in Apple have been "optimized" for the new chip; but not only its own, since the company has also collaborated with other developers to facilitate the launch of optimized apps ... but also capable of running on pre-Silicon Apple systems.




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Thus, from December Adobe will launch its Lighroom software as a 'universal app' and in early 2021 the new version of Adobe Photoshop would arrive. However, regardless of that handful of partner companies, most of the software ecosystem around macOS will continue to depend on older versions for a while.



And that's where Rosetta 2 comes in, an interpreter included in Big Sur with the goal of allow to run old binaries translating the instructions of the same so that they can be executed in Apple Silicon.






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